Monday, May 18, 2015

Scanning old negatives

Pentax K1000 & Pentax 135mm lens, Kodak Tri-X  [April 7, 1982]
My daughter is really loving theater and this made me want to pull out some photos I shot during college at East Carolina University's theater doing Show Boat.

To scan my negatives I used the Nikon Coolscan V-ED [Adorama has one for $739] On Amazon it sells for $2,000.
A high-performance dedicated film scanner from Nikon, the CoolScan V ED offers high-quality scanning of 35mm slides, 35mm film strips, APS film (with optional IX240 film adapter), and prepared slides (with optional medical slide holder). The Scanner-Nikkor ED glass lens offers a 4,000 dpi optical resolution, while the 3,964-pixel linear CCD image sensor and 14-bit A/D input (8-/16-bit output) provide true-to-life, brilliant results.
Nikon's own LED illumination technology ensures accurate color with no warm-up time or risk of heat damage. Scan times are as fast as 38 seconds including image transfer to display, and as fast as 14 seconds in preview mode. Automatic color/contrast compensation helps you achieve accurate results, while the ICE4 advanced digital image correction suite of technologies helps to restore old slides to their original glory. Additionally, the included Nikon Scan 4 software provides a comprehensive and easy-to-use interface for managing your scans.
The CoolScan V ED has a convenient plug-and-play USB interface, while one-touch scan and preview buttons will have you scanning film in no time. PC and Mac compatible, the CoolScan V ED also comes backed with a one year limited warranty.
Pentax K1000 and 50mm lens, Kodak Tri-X
Now if you have scratches and spots like in this photo here you will need to use PhotoShop to clean up the image.

SilverFast 8
Now Nikon has stopped supporting it so to make it work on my Macbook Pro I bought the software SilverFast 8.0 This software is even more advanced than the original Nikon Software that I used years ago.

Now the learning curve is a little steep to get used to scanning with the software.  Here you can see the version and what I set up for when I downloaded the software. You pick your scanner.


There are a lot of videos already made that you can watch to help you step by step. Just Google SilverFast 8 and look for just the videos, there are many to choose from.

Pentax K1000 and 50mm, Kodak Tri-X
There is one this great about the scanner. As compared to the time spent in a darkroom working on print forever burning and dodging, with the scanner and PhotoShop you can get far superior results.



Hope this inspires you.


4 comments:

Michael Largent said...

Does it work well with black and white negatives? I recently paid a company to scan nearly 400 of my b&w negs and they came back so soft I had them do it again, to no avail. So disappointed I asked for a refund and they complied. They were apparently over-ICEd or something.

Stanley Leary said...

Yes it works great with B&W, Color Negatives and Chromes. Here I posted scans from Kodak Tri-X. The SilverFast 8 software lets you pick the film stock and it helps get the calibration even better than when in the older days I had to create my own settings.

Aimee said...

What do you recommend for 120 film regarding scanners? Affordable ones.

Stanley Leary said...

The Nikon Coolscan 9000 ED is no longer made or supported, but did a great job for the money unless you used a drum style scanner.

If price is of concern then you may want to consider Plustek OpticFilm 8200i Ai Film Scanner which sells for $429.95. Here is a link to it at B&H http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/883631-REG/Plustek_783064365338_OpticFilm_8200i_Ai_Film.html